Former Chicago baseball stars Harold Baines and Lee Smith inducted into Hall of Fame

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. (AP) - Harold Baines has been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

The soft -spoken Baines never displayed much emotion in his 22-year career, but his voice cracked throughout his speech.

"Somehow I acquired a reputation for not saying much. I'm not sure why," he deadpanned at the start. "From teachers to coaches who showed me kindness and discipline, I thank you all for what you've done for me. If I can leave you with one message, it's to give back to your community. I stand here very humbled. It has taken time to sink in."

Baines, the first overall pick in the 1977 draft by the White Sox, played 22 seasons for the White Sox, Rangers, Athletics, Orioles and Indians, was a six-time All-Star, and twice won the Outstanding Designated Hitter Award. An eight-time .300 hitter who reached the 20-homer mark in 11 seasons, Baines drove in at least 90 runs eight times and ranks 34th on the all-time list with 1,628 RBIs. He retired with 2,866 hits and 1,628 RBIs, one of only 17 players in MLB history to have reached both 2,800 hits and 1,600 RBIs.

Baines saved his last moments to pay tribute to the White Sox and to his family, thanking his mom and dad and wife Marla, who also had to hold back tears.

"You are the true Hall of Famer of our family," Baines said as he looked out at his wife. "The game has given us a lot of shared moments, memories like today. Your presence here today makes my journey complete."

Lee Smith was also inducted into the Hall of Fame this afternoon.

Smiling from beginning to end, Smith congratulated his new classmates before crediting his family and hometown of Castor, Louisiana, for much of his success.

"It's been my family. They're the main reason I'm standing here today," Smith said. "To my mom and dad. Your support has meant everything to me."

Smith pitched 18 seasons for the Cubs, Red Sox, Cardinals, Yankees, Orioles, Angels, Reds and Expos and retired as MLB's all-time saves leader with 478, a title he held for 13 seasons. That total ranks third all-time, as do his 802 games finished.

A seven-time All-Star, Smith led his league in saves four times and reached the 30-save mark in 10 seasons. And he was a workhorse - of Smith's 478 saves, 169 required at least four outs and 94 required two or more innings.

The 6-foot-6 Smith was convinced to give up his love for basketball and chose baseball as his sport.

"I was 14 years old and I thought my future was basketball," said Smith, the first reliever to record 30 saves in 10 different seasons. "It wasn't just my arm that got me here. It's the whole community of Castor. I thank you."

Smith and Baines were elected in December by a veterans committee.