Mark Peterson

Reporter

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mark.peterson@wndu.com

After joining the 16 News Now team at WNDU-TV in 1985, Mark Peterson set out to build a solid reputation as one of Michiana's finest reporters. Not only has he accomplished that goal, but he's become the kind of journalist that other journalists look up to.

After joining the 16 News Now team at WNDU-TV in 1985, Mark Peterson set out to build a solid reputation as one of Michiana's finest reporters. Not only has he accomplished that goal, but he's become the kind of journalist that other journalists look up to.

Like many of his colleagues at WNDU, Mark grew up right here in Michiana. He attended high school in Dowagiac, Michigan and spent four semesters at Southwestern Michigan College before receiving a B.A. in communication arts/speech & rhetoric from Indiana University at South Bend.

A top-notch reporter, Mark is known for his ability to quickly grasp the facts and stay cool under pressure. He comes to WNDU-TV from WZZP-FM radio where he served as News Director from from 1984 until 1985. Prior to that, he spent three years as a reporter for WXMG/WRBR-FM radio in South Bend.

"I've been reporting for so long here in Michiana, it's like a way of life for me," says Mark. "I enjoy myself at work, it's like a family." Mark is an uncomplicated guy. He's very serious about being a good journalist, but he also knows how to have fun.

Mark and his wife Sue live in South Bend.

Email Mark at mpeterson@wndu.com.


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