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Some educators of color resist push for police-free schools

Karen Calloway, principal of Kenwood Academy in Chicago, poses Tuesday, July 28, 2020, for a portrait outside the Hyde Park neighborhood campus. School districts around the U.S. are working to remove police officers from campuses, but the school council for Kenwood Academy, a predominantly Black school near the University of Chicago, recently unanimously voted to keep its officer. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
Karen Calloway, principal of Kenwood Academy in Chicago, poses Tuesday, July 28, 2020, for a portrait outside the Hyde Park neighborhood campus. School districts around the U.S. are working to remove police officers from campuses, but the school council for Kenwood Academy, a predominantly Black school near the University of Chicago, recently unanimously voted to keep its officer. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)(Charles Rex Arbogast | AP)
Published: Jul. 31, 2020 at 4:40 PM EDT
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DENVER (AP) — School districts nationwide are working to remove officers from campuses, but some Black and Indigenous educational leaders are resisting the push prompted by the national reckoning over racist policing.

Some say the system is hamstrung by a complicated mix of police response policies and a lack of support for alternative programs.

They say that plays a role in students of color being disproportionately punished and arrested.

Others support individual officers skilled at working with students.

Still others say they need to learn more.

Cities like Portland, Oregon, Denver and Madison, Wisconsin, have taken steps to remove police from schools following George Floyd’s death at the hands of Minneapolis police.

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