Selected Community Events

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Christmas at Copshaholm: The World at War

Center for History, 808 W. Washington St., South Bend, IN 46601
With the elegant Oliver Mansion decorated for Christmas as a backdrop, travel back in time to the era of the Great War. Performers throughout the 38-room Oliver Mansion provide a touching, personal look at America’s response to the “war to end all wars.”
Tickets are limited and reservations are strongly recommended. Purchase online at www.centerforhistory.org or by calling 235-9664. $15/adults; $13/seniors; $11/members; $9/youth. The program is presented in partnership by the Center for History and the Acting Ensemble.


Marilyn Thompson, 574-235-9664, mthompson@centerforhistory.org


The Gallery After Dark - “Community of the Dead: Remembering the Great War”

Center for History, 808 W. Washington St., South Bend, IN 46601
Come to the dark side—meet the museum after hours and visit the exhibit World War I: The War to End All Wars. Hear Tom Murphy, Ph.D., IU South Bend, talk about the thousands of American soldiers who left their country for the very first time to fight on foreign soil and who would never see their homeland again. Take a curator-led tour of “The Home Front” and “Memorial Wall,” offered by Kristie Erickson and Travis Childs. Experience a dramatic reading by Bill Svelmoe, along with a wine-and-cheese reception. $16/adults, $14/members. Reservations required. Call 235-9664, ext. 233 or go online at www.centerforhistory.org. Use “Your Key to History” to earn museum rewards at this event.

Marilyn Thompson, 574-235-9664, mthompson@centerforhistory.org


Astrophysics to Zebrafish: 150 Years of Science at Notre Dame

Center for History, Raclin Gallery of Notre Dame History
In 1865, just 23 years after the University of Notre Dame was founded, the school established science as a course of study. Over the last 150 years, the field has grown into a major educational and research enterprise at the school. Today, Notre Dame’s College of Science offers courses in applied mathematics and statistics, biological science, chemistry and biochemistry, mathematics, and physics. Research efforts of the nearly 2,500 faculty and students in Notre Dame’s College of Science achieve significant results. Through such artifacts as early lab equipment, molecule models, and fossils, the exhibit captures all the intrigue and discovery of science, as well as the moments of research that have impacted the country, and indeed, the world.

Marilyn Thompson, 574-235-9664, mthompson@centerforhistory.org


Polished in Public, Fierce on the Field: The All-American Girls Professional Baseball League

Center for History, Lower Level Gallery, 808 W. Washington St., South Bend, IN 46601
The All-American Girls Professional Baseball League was an all-female professional baseball league that was begun by Philip Wrigley in 1943 and stayed active until 1954. The women chosen to play in the new league were serious athletes on the field who were expected to be beautiful and ladylike at all other times. These special women were successful on both counts.

Marilyn Thompson, 574-235-9664, mthompson@centerforhistory.org


Answering the Call: The Olivers and World War I

Center for History, Carroll Gallery, 808 W Washington St., South Bend, IN 46601
The impact of World War I on the city of South Bend is explored through the eyes of local industrialist J. D. Oliver. As the President of the Oliver Chilled Plow Works, J. D. saw the war influence not only his business but also his family, friends, and personal life. The exhibit chronicles wartime shortages and embargoes, as well as the extraordinary lengths to which the Olivers answered the call to personal service in support of the war effort.

Marilyn Thompson, mthompson@centerforhistory.org, (574) 235-9664


World War I: The War to End All Wars

Center for History - 808 W. Washington South Bend, IN 46601
It was 100 years ago in 1914 that World War I began with the murder of Archduke Ferdinand. Nation after nation lined up to fight on either the side of the Entente, led by France, or the Central Powers, led by Imperial Germany. These alliances had been building for over 20 years, with each side nursing old wounds and ready for revenge against past insults. All anticipated the battles would be over by Christmas, thinking new and improved technology would provide a definitive edge. Little did they conceive of a war that would last until 1918 and encompass the entire globe. Nor did they anticipate that it would cost the lives of 10 million soldiers, severely impair another 20 million and create 10 million refugees. In the summer of 1914, the war looked like a chance to prove one’s manhood rather than--as it became--a descent into hell.

Marilyn Thompson, 574-235-9664, marketing@centerforhistory.org