Neighborhood watch uses bicycles to promote safety

Neighborhood watch groups use a variety of methods to keep their residents safe. But one particular group in Goshen may be a bit different than most.

Wearing yellow vests, the Brookside Neighborhood Watch group likes to be visible whether they're on foot, in a vehicle or on a bike.

“When the kids see us they run … the teenagers,” said Judy Horton, a neighbor watch volunteer. “We'll be on this part, they'll go that way and that's where a lot of the crime was coming from. “Now, they take off to the other side of the park, and the crime has went down. We don't have any problems, it doesn't seem like it anyway.”

And chances are the troublemakers will have to keep moving because the dozen or so volunteers in Brookside Manor keep moving among the community's nearly 400 homes year round from Fridays to Sundays.

When they're not out on patrol, you can bet these neighborhood watchdogs are observing in other ways.

The Brookside Manor neighborhood watch is less than a year old, and already they've made a difference, and not just in reducing crime. .

“We needed it. We had a lot of vandalism and problems,” said Colleen Willets, another neighborhood watch. “The problems have really died down. They know we're here.”

“We've met people that we would never meet,” Willets added. “You live next door to somebody and never talk to them, but now they come and ask you. If they have something they need help with they'll ask us and as a group and we'll do it.”

Our cameras were rolling here last Halloween when members of the neighborhood watch kept on eye on things after some pranksters had set off firecrackers at the home of an elderly resident. ---- said it was a much quieter Halloween because of it.

“It was fun actually,” Horton said. “We all gathered down here at Rick and Colleen's house and took turns passing the candy out.”

Since the formation of its neighborhood watch, Halloween is just about the only night where things appear scary around here. Horton said this is one of the best things they could have done to make this a better place to live.

“It lets people know we're not afraid of them, that we want to be out here,” she said. “It's also got us to know our neighbors. I lived here for seven years, and for three, I didn't know anybody in the park and now I know a lot of members in the park. So, if you know your neighbors, that keeps your house safe.

Interestingly enough, Horton approached management at the mobile home park about starting a neighborhood watch and they declined. So, she and others decided to do it on their own.

Horton said they got the idea for the yellow vests, the team patrols and the two-way radios from officer Mario Mora, who was on patrol and he put them in touch them in touch with the Goshen Police Department.

Officer Mora continues to work closely with the group.
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Wearing yellow vests, the Brookside Neighborhood Watch group likes to be visible whether they're on foot, in a vehicle or on a bike.

“When the kids see us they run … the teenagers,” said Judy Horton, a neighbor watch. “We'll be on this part, they'll go that way and that's where a lot of the crime was coming from. “Now, they take off to the other side of the park, and the crime has went down. We don't have any problems, it doesn't seem like it anyway.”

And chances are the troublemakers will have to keep moving because the dozen or so volunteers in Brookside Manor keep moving among the community's nearly 400 homes year round from Fridays to Sundays.

When they're not out on patrol, you can bet these neighborhood watchdogs are observing in other ways.

The Brookside Manor neighborhood watch is less than a year old, and already they've made a difference, and not just in reducing crime. .

“We needed it. We had a lot of vandalism and problems,” said Colleen Willets, another neighborhood watch. “The problems have really died down. They know we're here.”

“We've met people that we would never meet,” Willets added. “You live next door to somebody and never talk to them, but now they come and ask you. If they have something they need help with they'll ask us and as a group and we'll do it.”

Our cameras were rolling here last Halloween when members of the neighborhood watch kept on eye on things after some pranksters had set off firecrackers at the home of an elderly resident. ---- said it was a much quieter Halloween because of it.

“It was fun actually,” Horton said. “We all gathered down here at Rick and Colleen's house and took turns passing the candy out.”

Since the formation of its neighborhood watch, Halloween is just about the only night where things appear scary around here. Horton said this is one of the best things they could have done to make this a better place to live.

“It lets people know we're not afraid of them, that we want to be out here,” she said. “It's also got us to know our neighbors. I lived here for seven years, and for three, I didn't know anybody in the park and now I know a lot of members in the park. So, if you know your neighbors, that keeps your house safe.

Interestingly enough, Horton approached management at the mobile home park about starting a neighborhood watch and they declined. So, she and others decided to do it on their own.

Horton said they got the idea for the yellow vests, the team patrols and the two-way radios from officer Mario Mora, who was on patrol and he put them in touch them in touch with the Goshen Police Department.

Officer Mora continues to work closely with the group.


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