Furry friend helps predict seizures for little Plymouth girl


It's long been said that dog is man's best friend, but in the case of a little girl from Plymouth a dog could be her lifesaver, literally.
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We first introduced you to little Allison "Ally" Krupp 18 months ago. Ally looks like any other six year old, but she's not. She suffers from a rare seizure disorder called Intractable Epilepsy. She is not a candidate for surgery.
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Ally takes medication but still has seizures every other day.
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In their search for help the Krupp family heard about service dogs through a company called "4 Paws for Ability" out of Ohio.
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Dogs can, through smell, sense a seizure before it occurs.

The dogs cost 22-thousand dollars and the Krupp's had to raise half that money in order to qualify. They held numerous fundraisers and in August got the letter they had been waiting for. Ally was getting her service dog, a one year old Golden Retriever named Periwinkle.
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They welcomed Periwinkle, Peri for short, into their home two months ago but not before Becky, her husband and Ally traveled to Ohio for twelve days of training. Becky says it was a lot of work, adding, "We had to learn all the commands for the dog and the dog had to learn, not only did they have to listen to their trainers, they had to listen to us."
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The training included visits to a mall and park where Peri would have to learn how to track Ally, to learn how to always stay by her side.
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Now home, that training continues each day and after Becky puts Peri through the motions there are high fives between dogs and owner and, of course, some treats.

Becky says in two short months it is clear, Peri has been a Godsend.

"I think it's going great. We've seen a lot of difference in Ally. Now if she starts to get upset, or is crying, Peri comes running over to her, just like that."
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And Peri, who already predicting Ally's seizures while they were training in Ohio. Becky says, "three times she told us ten hours before her seizure."

Allowing the Krupp's to adjust Ally's meds and prevent a seizure or its severity.
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Since being home there has been an adjustment period for both the Krupp's and Peri. They are still working on cues and Peri doesn't have predicting a seizure down to a science, but she is getting there. Becky says she is confident that very soon they will meet their goal. "She will be able to let us know when the seizures are happening and hopefully pre-alerting will come back. Because in Ohio it as there."
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Becky says knowing seizures are coming on could literally save her daughters life, "She doesn't make any sound, so I could walk in her room and have no idea how long she's been seizing. But if Peri is there to start barking and let us know that she's having one, definitely!"
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And having Ally means mom and daughter are finally enjoying the little things in life. Before Peri joined the family Becky had to carry Ally everywhere because she didn't want to walk. Now Ally has learned to walk tethered to Peri and the three of them are able to enjoy long walks outdoors or even through the mall. .
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The Krupp's say they don't know what the future holds for Ally, but they do know that Peri will be by her side, adding, "I've seen such a difference in Ally, she's got a best friend."

A best friend that just happens to walk on four legs.
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If you would like more information on service dogs like Periwinkle, just click on the link below.


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