Exhumed body of dead lottery winner yields no new information

This undated photo provided by the Illinois Lottery shows Urooj Khan, 46, of Chicago's West Rogers Park neighborhood, posing with a winning lottery ticket. The Cook County medical examiner said Monday, Jan. 7, 2013, that Khan was fatally poisoned with cyanide July 20, 2012, a day after he collected nearly $425,000 in lottery winnings.  (AP Photo/Illinois Lottery)

This undated photo provided by the Illinois Lottery shows Urooj Khan, 46, of Chicago's West Rogers Park neighborhood, posing with a winning lottery ticket. The Cook County medical examiner said Monday, Jan. 7, 2013, that Khan was fatally poisoned with cyanide July 20, 2012, a day after he collected nearly $425,000 in lottery winnings. (AP Photo/Illinois Lottery)

Investigators determined that the Chicago businessman who died the day after he collected his $1 million lottery ticket was in fact poisoned.

In July 2012, Urooj Khan, 46, won big on a scratch off lottery ticket. The very day after he received his pay-out, Khan died.

The medical examiner on the case originally said Khan died of natural causes, but, an autopsy determined Khan was poised with cyanide and his death was ruled a homicide.

Khan’s body was exhumed in February so further tests could be conducted, but on March 1 the Cook County medical examiner, Dr. Stephen Cina, said the autopsy has yielded no significant new clues about how exactly he died.

The examiner explained that the body was too badly decomposed after it was exhumed to provide any new information, including how the lethal cyanide was administered. Dr. Cina explained there are multiple ways for cyanide to get into a person’s system.

“Ingestion is one way to get cyanide into the body. Inhalation is another way. Injection would be another way. So there are several ways to get it into a body. All we can say as forensic pathologist is that there is a certain level of cyanide in the blood,” Dr. Cina added.

The most recent investigation showed that one of Khan’s arteries was 75-percent blocked, and that coronary artery disease also contributed to his death. In the meantime, Khan’s widow continues to battle with family members over control of Khan’s estate which include the lottery winnings.


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